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Last year, a 20-year-old woman was killed in an Alabama manufacturing plant when she attempted to fix a machine that had stopped working. According to news reports at the time, the woman was working on a large crane with three other employees. When the crane stopped working properly, the woman called maintenance but received no response.

FactoryThe woman and three other co-workers tried to get the machine working again. The woman entered the cage that contained the machine, and while she was inside the cage, the machine started running again. She sustained critical injuries and was taken to the hospital, where she died the next morning.

The plant where the accident occurred manufactures car parts for Kia and Hyundai. According to a recent news source, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration conducted a six-month investigation into the accident, concluding that the accident could have been prevented had the appropriate precautions been taken by the employer.

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Earlier this month, the Georgia House of Representatives just passed Georgia House Bill 152, which would presume workers’ compensation coverage for firefighters diagnosed with certain types of cancer. According to an industry news source discussing the Georgia bill and other similar bills in other states, the House Bill will now move on to the Georgia Senate. A similar bill passed both houses last year before Georgia Governor Nathaniel Deal vetoed it over concerns that the research supporting the link between cancer and firefighters’ exposure to harmful chemicals was too speculative.

FiremanThis article is the most recent evidence of the movement across the nation for states to increase firefighters’ workers’ compensation benefits to include certain types of cancer. Supporters of GA Bill 152 and other similar bills point to the host of synthetic materials that are used in the construction of modern-day homes, which when burned, release harmful chemicals that can cause cancer and other serious illnesses.

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Earlier this month, a tragic accident took the life of a veteran sheriff’s deputy in Augusta, Georgia. According to one local news report covering the accident, the sheriff’s deputy was responding to an alarm that was sent out from a local sperm bank for a nitrogen leak. Evidently, the deputy arrived on the scene before the fire department or hazmat team and entered the location.

SteamBy the time the hazmat team arrived about 30 minutes later, rescuers discovered the deputy’s body lying on the floor. A female employee of the sperm bank was also unconscious. Rescuers removed the two and transported them to the hospital, but sadly the sheriff’s deputy was pronounced dead a short time later. The cause of death was listed as inhaling an unknown chemical substance. Two other deputies were also taken to the hospital, and they are expected to recover.

Following the tragic news of the accident, Georgia’s Occupational Health and Safety Administration opened an investigation into the chemical leak. The investigation is ongoing, and no results have yet been made public.

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Last year, the Georgia Court of Appeals issued a written opinion in a workers’ compensation case that shows how strictly the state’s statutes of limitations will be enforced against injured workers who do not file a timely claim. In the recent case, the state’s high court determined that an intermediate appellate court improperly held that the injured worker’s claim for benefits was not time-barred by the two-year statute of limitations. As a result of the most recent ruling, the injured worker will not be entitled to the benefits he once enjoyed.

Factory ExteriorThe Facts of the Case

W.B. was an employee in a wood-processing plant. In 1993, W.B. fell through a floor while on the job, and his leg landed in a moving auger. W.B.’s leg had to be immediately amputated below the knee.

Initially, W.B. was approved for temporary total disability (TTD) benefits. After he recovered, he was fit with a prosthetic leg and was able to return to work. Because of his previous injuries, upon his return to work, he took on a supervisory position that was less physically demanding. During this time, his TTD benefits were replaced by permanent partial disability (PPD) benefits. His last PPD payment was issued in 1998.

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Earlier this month, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced that it was recommending that a Gainesville, Georgia recycling plant be fined upwards of $100,000 for several alleged serious safety violations. According to a recent news report documenting OSHA’s decision to levy the fines, the violations involved apparent amputation hazards, fire hazards, and a failure to implement a noise-reduction monitoring policy.

Recycling PlantIn all, OSHA noted 21 alleged serious errors and another three other-than-serious violations. Apparently, several dangerous machines did not have the required guards to prevent a worker’s hand or arm from getting caught up in the machine and potentially amputated. Additionally, the employer allegedly failed to provide all employees with personal protective clothing.

An OSHA representative told reporters that these alleged violations are “preventable by taking basic safety precautions.” However, the company’s alleged failure to meet these basic requirements increased the likelihood of a serious or fatal workplace injury.

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Over the past few years, the discussion over chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has reached a boiling point in the NFL. The seriousness of CTE cannot be overestimated, with symptoms that include depression, memory loss, anxiety, and progressive dementia, among others. Indeed, many players afflicted with CTE have committed suicide as a result of the mental health issues they face. Making matters more difficult, CTE cannot readily be diagnosed while a player is alive; however, doctors can somewhat confidently diagnose CTE in some cases, based on observed symptoms.

Football GameLast year, an agreement was reached between the NFL and several thousand players, whereby the NFL would pay out up to $1 billion in claims to former players as well as the families of players posthumously diagnosed with CTE. However, the NFL players’ Collective Bargaining Agreement does not list CTE as a work-related disease, and it provides no coverage for the disease. This means that, up to this point, compensation is only available through personal injury lawsuits, such as the one discussed above.

According to an industry news source, however, a group of NFL players has asked a court to read a term into their Collective Bargaining Agreement to cover CTE as a work-related disease. If the players are able to get their agreement with the NFL to cover CTE, players suffering from the symptoms of CTE and the families of players who have been posthumously diagnosed with CTE will be able to obtain benefits without needing to establish that the NFL was negligent or at fault in any way. This would create an easier means of recovery for many players and their families.

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Earlier this month, the Georgia Court of Appeals issued a written opinion in a workers’ compensation case that required the court to interpret the sole-remedy provision contained in the Georgia Workers’ Compensation Act. In the case, Saxon v. Starr Indemnity and Liability Company, the court held that although the plaintiff’s employer was required to carry workers’ compensation insurance but failed to do so, a workers’ compensation claim was still the plaintiff’s sole remedy. Thus, the court dismissed his personal injury claim against the employer.

Ice Cream TruckThe Facts of the Case

Saxon’s employer was in the ice cream and freezer business. On the day in question, Saxon was riding as a passenger in a delivery truck when the driver, a co-worker, rear-ended another vehicle. Saxon’s co-worker was cited for following too closely.

Saxon’s employer was required under Georgia law to obtain workers’ compensation insurance. However, for whatever reason, his employer had failed to obtain this coverage. Perhaps thinking a workers’ compensation claim would be fruitless because his employer lacked coverage, Saxon did not file a workers’ compensation claim but instead filed a personal injury claim against his employer, seeking compensation for his injuries.

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Owners of large farms often rely on the contracted labor of migrant workers to help them fulfill their staffing needs around the busy harvest time. However, since these farms so rarely need this volume of labor, farm owners usually lack the infrastructure necessary to provide transportation for these workers. As a result, farm owners will often contract under-the-table transportation companies to get workers from their homes to the farm.

Tossing Hay BalesAccording to a recent Georgia news source, the system that many farm owners use to get temporary workers to their farms is dangerous and too often underinsured. The article discusses a November 2015 accident in which six farm workers were killed and another seven injured when the bus they were riding in struck a concrete bridge support, ripping the roof off the bus. The company that operated the bus had not registered with the U.S. Department of Labor, meaning that it was not legally permitted to transport workers. Furthermore, the driver of the bus did not even have a commercial driver’s license.

To make matters worse, the company’s workers’ compensation policy did not cover the bus ride. As a result, since the transportation company carried just one-fifth of the required insurance on the bus, the families of the deceased were left with a much smaller total sum of money than necessary to cover their expenses and losses.

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Earlier this month, an appellate court in Arkansas issued a written opinion highlighting the importance of ensuring that workers’ compensation claims are timely filed. In the case, Hendrix v. Alcoa, the court dismissed a widow’s wrongful death claim against her deceased husband’s former employer, based on the fact that a workers’ compensation claim was the sole remedy for her loss. However, since her husband had failed to filed his workers’ compensation claim in a timely manner, the widow will not receive any compensation for the loss of her husband.

FactoryThe Facts of the Case

Mr. Hendrix worked for Alcoa for nearly 30 years, retiring in 1995. During his employment, Hendrix was exposed to asbestos. Seventeen years after his retirement, in 2012, he was diagnosed with an asbestos-related cancer. Later that year, he filed a workers’ compensation claim, seeking benefits for what he claimed to be a work-related diagnosis. However, a judge dismissed Hendrix’s claim because it was filed after the statute outlining the amount of time a worker had to file a case had expired. Specifically, in Arkansas, an injured worker has two years to file a claim from the date of last exposure. Hendrix did not appeal the decision.

In the following year, Hendrix died. His wife filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Alcoa, claiming that the company was responsible for her husband’s diagnosis and subsequent death.

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Earlier this year in October, a pipeline explosion in Shelby County, Alabama claimed one man’s life and injured several others. In a recent news update, one of the men injured in the explosion has died from his injuries, increasing the death toll to two.

PipelineEvidently, the explosion occurred when an excavator for a Georgia-based construction company struck an underground transmission pipeline when using a backhoe. The pipeline, which was carrying gasoline, burst and began to leak. The gas ignited, causing a small fire. At the time, one man was pronounced dead and five others taken to area hospitals. One of the five injured men was hospitalized until recently, when he passed away from the injuries he sustained in the explosion.

A local ABC affiliate reported that the construction company has been cited by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) eight times between the years of 2009 and 2013. These violations all occurred on job sites in Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. In fact, five of those violations were considered “serious” by OSHA, and three directly involved the company’s excavation work.

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