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Protect Our Teens This Summer from a Work Accident in Georgia

Do you have a child that is going to work over the summer? You may want to make sure that they’re working an age-appropriate job with all safety requirements met. Parents are urged to peek in on their young workers, without being too obvious of course, to make sure that they remain safe on the job this summer.
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According to the Occupational Safety & Health Administration, all workers are entitled to safe and healthful working conditions. Employers are responsible for keeping all workers from potential harm. It is only reasonable to assume that our young workers are not aware of their rights in the workplace. They may not be familiar with what the current child labor laws are or what their employers are required to do for them to protect them from a work accident in Atlanta.

Our Georgia workers’ compensation attorneys urge you to get familiar with these rights and regulations if you too are not aware of them already. You can read the Workers Rights under the Occupational Safety and Health Act and share it with your child to make sure that there treated equally and protected from harm at work this summer.


Tips to help ensure their child has a safe and rewarding job during the summer break:

-Get familiar with the Federal and State child labor laws. This will better help you to determine if their employer is abiding by these rules. Federal law limits the number of hours that young adults can work in a number of jobs. There are also jobs and work-related activities that children under the age of 18 are prohibited from participating in under federal law.

-You are urged to get involved in your child’s employment decisions. It is important for you to know where your young worker is working and exactly what they’ll be doing. Get involved. Ask them, often, what they did at work. Encourage them to talk about any problems or concerns.

-Talk with your young worker about the jobs they’re involved with and the training and supervision that is provided, if any, by the employer.

-It is encouraged that you keep an eye out for signs that their job is taking too much of a physical or mental toll on your child. Be sure that they’re not too exhausted for other activities. Be sure that they’re not losing interest or energy for other hobbies. If they’re experiencing any of this, then the job may be too demanding for them. Other signs of overwork can include increased stress levels, anxiety, fatigue, and depression.

As agricultural jobs are quite common in our state, it is important for us to keep an eye on our young workers that choose employment in this industry. According to OSHA, more than 40 percent of young workers that were killed from 1992 to 2000 were killed in agriculture jobs. More than a third of these deaths happened around tractors.

Young work injury may occur when:

-Operating unsafe equipment.

-Working under stressful conditions.

-Lacking adequate safety training.

-A lack of adequate supervision.

-Working under severe pressure.

-Participating in dangerous work that is illegal or inappropriate for young workers.

“The biggest problem with young workers is attitude,” explains According to Bryan Lowe of the BC Safety Council. “Ironically they have a great attitude. They are so happy to have a job that they’ll do almost anything. Young workers need to know that they need to be safe, and that if they aren’t safe, then the whole point of the job is defeated. So safety has to come first.”

The lawyers at the Law Offices of J. Franklin Burns, P.C., have the experience to help you gain the benefits you are entitled to under the Georgia workers’ compensation program. Call for a free and confidential appointment to discuss your rights. Call 1-404-303-7770.


More Blog Entries:

OSHA Launches Photography Contest to Increase Awareness of Work Accidents in Georgia and Elsewhere, Georgia Workers Compensation Attorney Blog, May 25, 2011

Summer Months Raise Concern for Heat-related Work Injuries in Georgia
, Georgia Workers Compensation Attorney Blog, May 16, 2011